PyCon 2012 Video Round-Up

The videos from PyCon 2012 are posted. Here are the ones I plan to watch, along with their summaries:

Checking Mathematical Proofs Written in TeX

ProofCheck is a set of Python scripts which parse and check mathematics written using TeX. Its homepage is http://www.proofcheck.org. Unlike computer proof assistants which require immersion in the equivalent of a programming language, ProofCheck attempts to handle mathematical language formalized according to the author’s preferences as much as possible.

Sketching a Better Product

If writing is a means for organizing your thoughts, then sketching is a means for organizing your thoughts visually. Just as good writing requires drafts, good design requires sketches: low-investment, low-resolution braindumps. Learn how to use ugly sketching to iterate your way to a better product.

Bayesian Statistics Made (as) Simple (as Possible)

This tutorial is an introduction to Bayesian statistics using Python. My goal is to help participants understand the concepts and solve real problems. We will use material from my (nb: Allen Downey’s) book, Think Stats: Probability and Statistics for Programmers (O’Reilly Media).

SQL for Python Developers

Relational databases are often the bread-and-butter of large-scale data storage, yet they are often poorly understood by Python programmers. Organizations even split programmers into SQL and front-end teams, each of which jealously guards its turf. These tutorials will take what you already know about Python programming, and advance into a new realm: SQL programming and database design.

Web scraping: Reliably and efficiently pull data from pages that don’t expect it

Exciting information is trapped in web pages and behind HTML forms. In this tutorial, you’ll learn how to parse those pages and when to apply advanced techniques that make scraping faster and more stable. We’ll cover parallel downloading with Twisted, gevent, and others; analyzing sites behind SSL; driving JavaScript-y sites with Selenium; and evading common anti-scraping techniques.

Some of it may be above my head at this stage, but I think it’s great that the Python community makes all of these resources available.