Classifying Olympic Athletes by Sport and Event (Part 2)

This is the second post in a three-part series. The first post, giving some background and describing the data, is here. In that post I pointed out David Epstein’s claim that he could identify an Olympian’s event knowing only her height and weight. The sheer number of Olympians–about 10,000–makes me skeptical, but I decided to see whether machine learning could accurately produce the predictions Mr. Epstein claims he could.

To do this, I tried four different machine learning methods. These are all well-documented methods implemented in existing R packages. Code and data for is here (for sports) and here (for events).

The first two methods, conditional inference trees (using the party package) and evolutionary trees (using evtree), are both decision tree-based approaches. That means that they sequentially split the data based on binary decisions. If the data falls on one side of the split (say, height above 1.8 meters) you continue down one fork of the tree, and if not you go down the other fork. The difference between these two methods is how the tree is formed: the first recursively partitions the data based on conditional probability, while the second method (as the name suggests) uses an evolutionary algorithm. To get a feel for how this actually divides the data, see the figure below and this post.

 

If a single tree is good, a whole forest must be better–or at least that’s the thinking behind random forests, the third method I used. This method generates a large number of trees (500 in this case), each of which has access to only some of the features in the data. Once we have a whole forest of trees, we combine their predictions (usually through a voting process). The combination looks a little bit like the figure below, and a good explanation is here.

 

The fourth and final method used–artificial neural networks–is a bit harder to visualize. Neural networks are sort of a black box, making them difficult to interpret and explain. At a coarse level they are intended to work like neurons in the brain: take some input, and produce output based on whether the input crosses a certain threshold. The neural networks I used have a single hidden layer with 30 (for sports classification) or 50 hidden nodes (for event classification). To get a better feel for how neural networks work, see this three part series.

That’s a very quick overview of the four machine learning methods that I applied to classifying Olympians by sport and event. The data and R code are available at the link above. In the next post, scheduled for Friday, I’ll share the results.